Thales awarded Edmonton North LRT Extension Signalling Contract

Thales Canada announced that it has been awarded the signalling contract for the city of Edmonton's latest Light Rail Transit (LRT) extension and upgrade program. Thales will provide its world-leading SelTrac Communications-Based Train Control (CBTC) solution, proven in use by major metro operators around the world. The award for Edmonton's North LRT, terminating at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), is valued at $45M CAD. The North LRT is scheduled to open to public service in April 2014.

"By applying SelTrac CBTC technology, which allows trains to run safely more closely together, the Edmonton Transit System will improve train frequency throughout the LRT network, increasing convenience for NLRT riders," said Carl Wright, LRT fleet and electrical systems engineering supervisor for the Edmonton Transit System (ETS). "The advanced signalling technology minimizes equipment requirements for the extension, and will provide overall safety to the system, operating efficiencies, and optimization of traffic interfaces. The installation of this CBTC technology will provide Edmonton with the most advanced driver operated light rail transit system in Canada."

More than 10 km of track and the entire ETS fleet of 94 LRT cars will be equipped with Thales' CBTC system, which will be integrated with the existing ETS signalling system. The CBTC solution, proven worldwide to significantly improve operations and train frequency, incorporates computers on board the trains and along the track that communicate via continuous radio transmission, providing for safe and reliable train operation.

"We are very proud to have been selected by the city of Edmonton to help them realize their vision for a fully integrated, city-wide transportation network," said Paul Kahn, president and CEO, Thales Canada. "Edmonton will be the third major city in Canada and the 27th in the world to be using our Canadian-designed train control solution. A solution that is engineered to meet the long-term light-rail growth needs of the city."

With continual innovation, Thales' CBTC technology has been in use throughout
Vancouver's driverless SkyTrain system since 1986, and on Toronto's Scarborough Rapid Transit Line since 1985. There are 900 km of track worldwide moving more than 2 billion passengers a year that operate with Thales' SelTrac CBTC and an additional 200km of track to be added by the end of 2014.

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